Russian Food Felix Wong

“There’s a little store I want to take you to,” Katia said as we walked around the Sutra Baths adjacent to the Cliff House of San Francisco.

Turned out it was a Russian food market. I had never been to one so it was a pleasure to see a lot of the foods that Katia grew up with in her native Ukraine. And to feast on.

Below are photos of some of the foods. The highlight for me was the fried fish, which we layered on top of rye bread with dill and squash sauce back in our hotel room.

“What do people do in four-star hotels?” Katia would later joke. “Eat fried fish” was apparently the answer.

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Photos

The pictures below were taken with a Canon Powershot ELPH 110 HS.


Katia with different kinds of Russian candy.Zefeer & chcolate Russian style marshmallows.Babushka sugar free cookies. I think Babushka is also used as a term of endearment.Katia said the grape juice was good.Katia picking out some fried anchovies.Pickled watermelon.  Not bad, but not as good as unpickled watermelon.The picked tomatoes were surprisingly good.About to kiss the fried fish... or eat it?Our spread.Katia, ever so resourceful, cuts the fried fish with the tin lid from the squash sauce.Fried fish with dill on rye bread.  So good.

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